Religious FreedomPrint

Christian T-Shirt Maker Gets Big Win

A Christian business owner in Kentucky is rejoicing today after the Kentucky Court of Appeals upheld a lower court decision that says he did nothing wrong when he declined to print T-shirts requested by the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization.

Blaine Adamson, owner of Hands on Originals, told said that his Christian faith kept him from printing shirts for an event.

“Specifically, it’s the ‘Lexington Pride Festival’, the name and that it’s advocating pride in being gay and being homosexual,” he said at the time. “I can’t promote that message. It’s something that goes against my belief system.”

The activist group, which has since changed its name to the Pride Community Services Organization, reported Adamson to the Human Rights Commission, which ruled against Adamson. From there, the case wound its way through the courts. Pride Community Services is now weighing whether it will appeal to the Kentucky Supreme Court.

Adamson was relieved when the ruling was announced Friday.

“I don’t leave my faith at the door when I walk into my business,” Adamson told the Lexington Herald-Leader. “In my case, fortunately, the legal system worked.”

Cases like Adamson’s demonstrate why believers in every state need to call on their lawmakers to pass strong religious freedom protections. Business owners should be free to live out their faith in the way they do their business—without fear of being punished for their beliefs by their own government.