Photo by Stephen Theis, father-in-law of the executive director of  Delaware
Family Policy Council, an ally  of Family Policy Alliance.

by Autumn Leva, Director of Policy & Communication

“Let there be light,” and then there was light. And it was good.

God separated the light from the darkness, and there was “day” and “night.”

God made two great lights — the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. And God saw that it was good.

There are some truths that are so self-evident that even we humans, try as we may to ignore them or claim that “truth is relative,” can’t obscure them. We see this play out during those times that unite our nation, touch our soul, and leave us forever changed.

This week’s eclipse was one of those times. Millions drove for miles to be in the “path of totality.”

The Guardian reported viewers’ reactions such as “life-changing,” “worth everything” and “awestruck.” At the end of the total eclipse, one person said, “I’m not religious but I think it’s something very like when God says, ‘Let there be light.’”

Indeed.

God made light and darkness, the Sun and the Moon, and called them “good.” He governs their paths perfectly, so that we neither freeze nor burn. The heavens declare the majesty of God. We saw this week that this is a truth that cannot be obscured.

Just as the awesome heavenly display united us as a people and boldly declared the truth of God’s authority and majesty over Creation, there are other more sobering times that bring us together and reinforce truths.

Charlottesville was one of those times. We saw racism on display, and we reject it as evil. Just like we rejected the Holocaust and brought its architects to justice.

Good and evil. Light and darkness. These themes wage against each other in varying forms in each generation with Truth always on trial and yet always prevailing, eventually.

In our time, Truth is on trial once again as it relates to:

Try as we may, these are truths that cannot be obscured. And, these truths are why Family Policy Alliance exists. Our alliance strives to be your family’s voice declaring these truths at state capitols around the country, and we work to advance public policy that reflects these truths.

Even in elections, we work to train and then elect state and national leaders who will not just talk about these truths in order to win an election — but will truly live them out whether they serve at your state capitol or in Washington, D.C. And, we also equip pastors and church leaders to speak these truths to a nation searching for meaning, answers and Light.

In other words, our heart is to help you, your church and your elected leaders be the light in the often dark world of politics and policy. If you too believe that that our laws and elected leaders should reflect unshakeable biblical truths, we hope you’ll partner with us. The easiest way is to make Family Policy Alliance part of your regular monthly giving.

Also, if you’re already connected with us by email, please make sure we have your street address. When something important happens in your state, like a major pro-life bill or legislation that could limit your parental rights, we send special alerts specific to your state and district. Accurate addresses help us make sure these alerts go to the right place. Make sure your address is correct here.

Imagine, as we all work together to restore biblical truths to the laws and politics in our state — we can then say with one voice “and then there was Light.”

Dear Friends,

Last Saturday, a man participating in a “rally” in Charlottesville, Virginia, drove his car into a crowd of counter-protestors, injuring 19 and killing one. The suspect has been arrested and charged with multiple crimes, including murder.

The driver was participating in a “rally” organized by white nationalists. He was photographed standing with other protestors carrying a shield bearing one group’s logo. To be clear, these are groups that claim America is an exclusively a white nation and that people with “white blood” have a special bond with American soil.

All these many miles away in Idaho, we witnessed evil that showed utter contempt for the Creator.  We are all created in God’s image.  In Idaho, we ache for our fellow Americans so far away.  In Idaho, we wonder what is happening to us as a country.

This incident has stirred a national conversation about race and racism in America. For Christians, the central question is, “What does the Bible have to say about this?” The answer is straightforward:

You can be a follower of Christ or a white supremacist, but you can’t be both.

The dignity of every human life is a tenet of Christian faith. It is derived from the belief that God creates every person “in His image” (Gen. 1:27). Therefore, as Image Bearers, every person has inherent dignity, is precious, and has unalienable rights worthy of the protection of our laws.

One biblical application of this principle is opposition to abortion. Unborn babies are created in God’s image, therefore we work to protect them from being killed. The same principle rejects racism, because people of every race, color and ethnicity are created in the Image of God. Each person is an irreplaceable piece in God’s tapestry.

A claim of superiority by any group is evil and a rejection of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

To reject a person because of their race is a rejection of God’s way, but it is also means missing out on a gift that God has given us: In our differences, we see a fuller portrait of Him.

The Gospel speaks truth into the cultural issues of our time.  The church…we…need to become more fluent in applying biblical principles to life in 21st century America.

In the aftermath of the Charlottesville attack, many expressed hope that pastors would speak to this same truth from their pulpit. The Gospel has something to say to racism, just as it has something to say about abortion, sexual sin, and more.

Rick Hogaboam, Pastor at Sovereign Grace Fellowship in Nampa wrote this,  “Racial tribalists and ethno-nationalists hate the Gospel of a crucified, Jewish Messiah offering salvation to all people. I love this Gospel, which is why I absolutely hate racism and find deplorable any teaching that subordinates blacks or any people group based on their skin color. ‘For God so loved the world.'”

Did your pastor say anything? If so, would you email me and tell me about it? Family Policy Alliance of Idaho wants to connect with church leaders who understand this responsibility.

Sincerely,

Julie Lynde
Policy Director

Last Saturday, we saw what happens when the truth of Genesis 1:27, that God made man – all humanity – in His own image, is forgotten. There can be no equivocation, no half-statements, no second guessing what happened in Charlottesville, Virginia. Hatred of other people, merely for the color of their skin, ruled the day.

The man who drove his car into the crowd and those white supremacists he came to join showed pure and utter evil. Their hatred of the image of God should shock us all.

Let me be abundantly clear: You can be a follower of Christ or a white supremacist, but you can’t be both.

The dignity of every human life is a tenet of Christian faith. It is derived from the belief that God creates every person “in His image” (Gen. 1:27). Because of Imago Dei, every person has inherent dignity, is precious, and has rights.

But, this conversation should not begin and end when we see overt racism. It should not stay on our conscience for only as long as the memory of the young woman who lost her life is still fresh. The celebration of the Imago Dei, the cherishing of all human life, should drive our passion to eradicate eugenics-driven Planned Parenthood centers around our nation, and it should flow through our conversations as we consider genetic “screening tests” for preborn babies.

You see, as the nation was rightly riveted and outraged by the events of Charlottesville, few discussed a CBS News story that proclaimed Iceland ahead of other nations in “eradicating” Down Syndrome. The story seemed pleased that the condition was “disappearing” in the nation.

The truth, however, is that Icelanders – believing themselves genetically superior to those with Down Syndrome – are killing preborn babies based on a genetic test.

How disgusting! Yet, such attitudes toward human life are very much alive here in our nation. Preborn babies who are unwanted or somehow wrongly defined as “flawed,” the infirm, the elderly, and, yes, those of a different race, are often discarded and even hated for the diversity the Maker endowed upon them. All of them fully bear the image of God.

Man’s original sin was largely rooted in a belief in his wisdom over God’s. Shortly thereafter comes a hatred of the very image of God and a destruction of human life. How it must grieve the heart of our Lord to see hatred of His own image in our nation!

To consider oneself superior to another for any reason is to reject God; it is sin.

In the aftermath of the Charlottesville attack, some (including me) expressed hope that pastors would talk about it from their pulpits. The Gospel has something to say about racism. It has something to say about how we value human life. For victims of racism, it is a message of hope and justice; for those with racism in their hearts, the Gospel brings conviction and calls for repentance.

Did your church address what happened in Charlottesville? If not, this may be the time to politely ask your pastor, “Why not?” Ask whether your church exists to provide answers to a world in need? And, can your church glorify its King if we fail to discuss the important issues today surrounding the Imago Dei?

At Family Policy Alliance of Georgia, we will work to empower the church here to speak out, and we will work to protect the image of God, alive and well in all people, in our political and policy efforts.

Your prayers for our nation, our state, the church, for our witness, and for our efforts to honor our Savior are, as always, much appreciated.

Joining you in sorrow and in hopeful prayer,

Cole Muzio
Executive Director

Last Saturday, in Charlottesville, Virginia, a man drove his car into a crowd, injuring 19 and killing one person who were protesting a white supremacy march. The driver was photographed at a protest standing with members of a white supremacist group and carrying a shield bearing the group’s logo shortly before the incident. He was arrested and charged with multiple crimes, including murder.

This despicable, racist incident has stirred a national conversation about race and racism in America. People wonder if our faith has anything to say about this.

It most definitely does.

I believe that you can be a follower of Christ with a message bearing His love or you can be a white supremacist with a message of hate, but you can’t be both. The dignity of every human life is a tenet of Christian faith. It is derived from the belief that God creates every person “in His image” (Gen. 1:27). Every person has inherent dignity, is precious, and has rights.

This principle is at the center of Christian ethics. For example, unborn babies are created in God’s image, therefore we work to protect them from being killed. People who are infirm, elderly, or deemed by the elites as “not useful to society” deserve similar advocacy when faced with the growing threat of “assisted suicide.”

This belief puts racism at odds with Christianity. People of every race, color and ethnicity are created in the image of God. The Bible teaches that each person is an irreplaceable piece in God’s tapestry. To consider oneself superior to another in God’s eyes for any reason is a sin.

In the aftermath of the Charlottesville attack, some expressed hope that pastors would talk about it from their pulpit. For victims of racism, it is a message of hope and justice; for those with racism in their hearts, the Gospel brings conviction and calls for repentance.  Did your church address what happened in Charlottesville? I hope so. Especially in our churches, the body of Christ, we exist to provide answers to a world in need.

Family Policy Alliance exists to give voice to biblical citizens in North Dakota and across the nation, including proclaiming Christ’s message of love for all, regardless of their race. Please join us in proclaiming this message.  Let others know that we stand with those who proclaim God’s love to all!

Sincerely,

Mark Jorritsma
Executive Director

Dear Friends,

Last Saturday, in Charlottesville, Virginia, a man plowed his car into a crowd, injuring 19 and killing one. The driver was photographed at a protest organized by notorious racist leaders standing with members of a white supremacist group and carrying a shield bearing the group’s logo. He was arrested and charged with multiple crimes, including murder.

This evil act of terrorism has stirred a national conversation about race and racism in America. People around the country are wondering if Christianity has anything to say.

It does.

You can be a follower of Christ or a white supremacist, but you can’t be both.

The dignity of every human life is a tenet of Christian faith. It is derived from the belief that God creates every person “in His image” (Gen. 1:27). Because of Imago Dei, every person has inherent dignity, is precious, and has rights.

This principle is central to Christian ethics. For example, preborn babies are created in God’s image, therefore we work to protect them from being killed. People who are infirm, elderly, or deemed “not useful to society” by the elites, deserve similar advocacy when faced with the growing threat of “assisted suicide.”

I shared my thoughts on this with Stuart Shepard in this week’s Family Policy Briefing.

The doctrine of Imago Dei puts racism at odds with Christianity, too. People of every race, color and ethnicity are created in the Image of God. The Bible teaches that each person is an irreplaceable piece in God’s tapestry. To consider oneself superior to another for any reason is to reject God; it is sin.

In the aftermath of the Charlottesville attack, some (including me) expressed hope that pastors would talk about it from their pulpit. The Gospel has something to say about racism. For victims of racism, it is a message of hope and justice; for those with racism in their hearts, the Gospel brings conviction and calls for repentance.

Did your church address what happened in Charlottesville? If not, this may be the time to politely ask your pastor, “Why not?” Ask whether your church exists to provide answers to a world in need? Family Policy Alliance exists to give voice to biblical citizens in Kansas and across the nation.

Sincerely,

Eric Teetsel
President

What do we say about Charlottesville?

Racism, protests, murder. This is clearly not what God desires for our nation. But it’s definitely what everyone is talking about this week.

Eric Teetsel, president of Family Policy Alliance of Kansas, says a person can be a follower of Jesus Christ or a white supremacist – but not both. He offers a biblical perspective connecting the dots from your pro-life beliefs to what should be preached in your church.