Pastors have the emotionally draining and time-consuming responsibility to shepherd their flock, disciple believers into spiritually maturity, and administrate the business affairs of their local congregation. The weight of ministry only intensified during the past six months due to the coronavirus, as disagreements over masks, financial decisions regarding paycheck protection and staffing, and the quick transition to offer a worship experience through an online platform became the top priority.

Their schedule is stretched as family needs must be addressed, secular vocational jobs must be worked, and numerous meetings must be attended. Yet, their moral voice and influence is desperately needed to reverse the negative trends of societal decline that impacts their congregation.

This is where Family Policy Alliance of New Jersey® steps in. We strive to help pastors navigate the urgent issues impacting the family structure and facilitate regular conversations between elected state legislators and clergy. I want to encourage you to forward this email to your pastor and let him know about three ways we can serve the church you attend.

  1. Statewide Leadership Video Calls
    Every month we intentionally build relationships and moderate healthy dialogue between pastors and state legislators. Despite the anti-family policies that continue to be introduced in Trenton, there are elected officials that are allies in our cause to see NJ be a state where God is honored, religious liberty flourishes, families thrive and life is cherished. These elected officials must take public positions on issues that many churches are hesitant to teach on. They face criticisms and challenges for promoting strong family policies. Therefore, it is imperative for them to feel and experience the support of pastors across our state. Our monthly video meetings are structured for pastors to pray for these state senators and assembly members, and to encourage them to remain committed to biblical values. In the past three months, Senator Mike Testa (R), Senator Anthony Bucco (R), and Assemblyman Bob Auth (R) have connected with pastors through these calls.
  2. Regional Pastor Briefings
    Each year we educate pastors on the most troubling issues that threaten the family structure in NJ. This September and October, pastors will learn the facts about the LGBT curriculum in schools, recreational marijuana, and our continued pro-life efforts. Locations for this year’s meetings include Toms River Rockaway, Mount Laurel, Egg Harbor Township, and Warren. Click here for more information.
  3. Church Ministry
    I regularly teach a Biblical message during worship services, bible conferences, and special events regarding the Christian’s Role in Public Policy. Drawing from the scared truth of scripture, we equip Christians to engage the government, and no matter the results, make sure that God is glorified in the process.

Finally, I urge you to do three things to help your pastor:

  1. Pray for them more.
  2. Criticize them less.
  3. Forward them this email.

Together, let’s make NJ better!

Blessings,

Shawn Hyland
Director of Advocacy


By Vince Torres, President and Executive Director

“Why did you wait so long to reopen?”
“Why are you being so reckless by opening this early?”
“COVID is just a conspiracy and by closing, you are sacrificing all our religious rights!”
“COVID is going to kill everyone in the church if you reopen!”
“I hate the web stream! I will see you in-person Sunday!”
“Make sure you keep the web stream. I won’t be back for a while.”

These statements are just a small representation of the “input” many pastors continue to receive during the COVID pandemic. For every churchgoer who is anxious to return to in-person services, there is another who is anxious about the prospect of in-person services, and so many other sentiments somewhere in between.

Over the past several weeks, I have had the privilege of speaking with pastors from all over New Mexico. They represent different denominations and lead churches of different sizes. And whether they pastor 50 people or 15,000 people, these pastors all share a common burden when it comes to addressing the challenges of COVID and safely relaunching our in-person services.

As a pastor, I understand these burdens well, and while some believe the decisions pastors face are rather easy, I assure you—they are not. Every person has an opinion about what our leaders should be doing—whether those leaders be pastors or elected officials. However, when it comes to the church, we should not treat our pastors as politicians, and rather than boosting their burdens, we should be bearing them.

Your pastor needs your prayers. “If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without reproach, and it will be given him.” -James 1:5

It has been written and stated many times—your pastor has never led or pastored through a pandemic before. They need wisdom, discernment, and added grace and love to effectively navigate the challenges before them. Pray for them daily.

Your pastor needs your patience. We ask you, brothers, to respect those who labor among you and are over you in the Lord and admonish you, and to esteem them very highly in love because of their work. 1 Thessalonians 5:12-13

The truth is, there is no perfect plan or strategy for your pastor to employ. Every decision they make will be met with approval from some and disapproval from others. They may make mistakes, and if/when they do, extend the same grace they have extended to you and honor them with patience as God’s appointed laborers.

Your pastor needs your provision. Let the one who is taught the word share all good things with the one who teaches.” Galatians 6:6

Please continue to give your time, talents, and treasure to your local church. As churches reopen, opportunities to serve will again be available and your pastor and church family need your help. As for your tithes and offerings, remember that they do not simply keep lights on in the church on Sundays—they keep food on your pastor’s family table the rest of the week; they put money and supplies into the hands of needy families in your church; and they support the furtherance of Gospel mission beyond your church doors.

Your pastor needs your protection. Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in preaching and teaching. 1 Timothy 5:17

One of the ways you can best honor your pastor is to protect them from unrighteous criticisms and sinful gossip. There is a big difference between expressing disagreement and sowing discord; and even when disagreements surface, remember that your pastor is leading a diverse church with a diversity of personalities and opinions. If you feel called to address a specific concern, do so in a biblical manner by communicating with your pastor directly. Encourage others to do the same.

The writer of Hebrews instructs us: “Obey your leaders and submit to them, for they are keeping watch over your souls, as those who will have to give an account.” There is an important truth here—that your pastor is responsible for your church and your people—not other churches and other people. Therefore, their decisions should not be made on the basis of what is best for the church or another church, but what is best for your church.

So, whether your pastor decides to open or delay reopening; to resume at one capacity or another; or to mandate certain restrictions or not—remember, they are doing so in a spirit of love and care for you. They need your prayers; they need your patience; they need your provision; and they need your protection—now more than ever.

Vince Torres, Executive Director

Last week, more than 100 pastors, faith, and ministry leaders gathered at the State Capitol for the annual Pastors’ Day at the Legislature, sponsored by Family Policy Alliance of New Mexico and New Mexico Prays. We sang, we worshipped, we prayed, and unbeknownst to me, a photographer from the Santa Fe New Mexican (Gabriela Campos – The New Mexican) captured this photo. Pictured are me and my good friend, Pastor Jason Dickenson, Lead Pastor of Harvest Church in Albuquerque.

I love this photo, not because I am in it; but because it captures a moment of deep prayer—a prayer of solemn desperation and confident expectation “that if we ask anything according to his will he hears us. And if we know that he hears us in whatever we ask, we know that we have the requests that we have asked of him” (1 John 5:14-15).

My first Legislative Session was in 2006. Thirteen years later, I can honestly say that this has been the most challenging Session I have ever been involved with. And yet, it has also been the most rewarding. Never before have I seen the level of engagement and participation from the public I have seen this year. Never before have I seen so many people of faith speaking up and getting involved in civic engagement.

This tells me something—God is answering my prayer.

At the beginning of this Legislative Session, I was well aware of the battle ahead. I knew that conventional victory, in terms of passing good legislation, was off the table. So, I began to pray for victory in another form—victory in the form of our ministry’s verse: “…but the people who know their God shall stand firm and take action” (Daniel 11:32).

To every one of you who have sent an email, made a phone call, attended a committee hearing, and/or participated in a rally—thank you for standing firm and taking action! We have a long way to go, but with your help and God’s blessing, we are moving towards a New Mexico where religious freedom flourishes, families thrive, and life is cherished.

Dear Friends,

What a privilege it was to join with several partner organizations for “Pastor’s Day at the Capitol” this week in Topeka. More than 50 pastors from across Kansas were introduced in the House and Senate, met with lawmakers, and – most importantly – prayed together for these leaders and our state.

State Rep. Kevin Jones speaks at the rally.

A huge thank you to the many members of the legislature who participated, Governor Brownback, and Secretary of State Kobach.

The event this year occurred the same week that the nation celebrated the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr. As I walked the halls of the Capitol with the church leaders in attendance I couldn’t help but think of these words from King’s Letter From a Birmingham Jail:

“There was a time when the church was very powerful. It was during that period that the early Christians rejoiced when they were deemed worthy to suffer for what they believed. In those days the church was not merely a thermometer that recorded the ideas and principles of popular opinion; it was the thermostat that transformed the mores of society.

“Things are different now. The contemporary church is so often a weak, ineffectual voice with an uncertain sound. It is so often the arch supporter of the status quo. Far from being disturbed by the presence of the church, the power structure of the average community is consoled by the church’s often vocal sanction of things as they are.

“But the judgment of God is upon the church as never before. If the church of today does not recapture the sacrificial spirit of the early church, it will lose its authentic ring, forfeit the loyalty of millions, and be dismissed as an irrelevant social club with no meaning for the twentieth century.“

These prophetic words about the church in America from 1963 are worth considering today. We still struggle to be “thermostats” and not merely “thermometers?” But, our event at the Capitol was a healthy reminder that all is not lost. There are many who remember the “authentic ring” of the early church and seek to bring the Gospel to bear on the issues of our time. I thank God for them.

Is your pastor a thermostat? Connect us with your pastor by emailing Robyn Essex at robyn.essex@familypolicyalliance.com.

Sincerely,

Eric Teetsel
President and Executive Director