The Texas House Speaker who consistently stood in the way of efforts to protect the privacy and safety of women in restrooms, locker rooms and showers, now says he will not seek re-election.

Dubbed a “moderate Republican” by the news media, Joe Straus was out of step with the people of the reliably conservative state. As well as stopping the bathroom bill, he also put the brakes on a school-choice plan to help families provide their children a better education through a private or Christian school.

Jonathan Saenz, president of our ally Texas Values, said a key committee chairman, Byron Cook, also announced he was stepping down.

“After 50-plus county Republican parties have censored or issued statements criticizing Speaker Straus and Chairman Cook, it seemed only a matter of time before the mounting grassroots and electoral pressure was too great for them to continue in office,” Saenz said. “Straus and Cook were the main opponents who held back the priority bills of a majority of Republicans in the House, including the Texas Privacy Act.”

In a win for families and small businesses, the Parkersburg, West Virginia, City Council rejected an ordinance that would have violated the privacy rights of moms and daughters. The ordinance would have created special rights to four new classes, including “sexual orientation” and “gender identity.”

If passed, the privacy and safety of Parkersburg’s women and girls would no longer have been protected, as any male willing to assert that he “identifies as female” would have had free access to girls’ restrooms, locker rooms and showers. In addition, Christian employers would have been open to lawsuits over hiring practices.

But families and business owners arrived four hours early and filled the chamber. Then they boldly shared their concerns with the council. Allen Whitt with our ally Family Policy Council of West Virginia was actively engaged in helping city leaders understand the issue.

“The message: Our third biggest city is on to you,” he explained. “We know the truth about SOGIs, and we courageously move to protect privacy, and defend businesses against the intentionally vague ordinance.”

After the vote, he heard an activist yell “I hope you die early!” at a Democrat council member who voted for women’s safety.

While the defeat of the ordinance is good news for the people of Parkersburg, the vote reminds us that people in cities large and small are wrestling with such laws and ordinances. State battles have garnered much attention, like in South Carolina and Texas, making it easy to forget city-councils are often at the front-lines of promoting a nation where God is honored.

Scottsdale, Arizona, is another city where a stand for truth is taking place at city hall. A small group of activists are trying to stop the city from partnering with a charter school to build a park and athletic facilities that would be open to the public. The reason: The school maintains that boys are boys and girls are girls.

The local level is where we can be most effective in protecting our families, schools, and small businesses. Let’s continue to stand together for liberty and truth both in the state house and city hall.

LEARN MORE
Ask Me First is a place to hear the stories of women and girls who have been affected by these misguided ordinances. And we invite you to share your own story.

We are currently facing what may be the most important bill this entire legislative session: House Bill 1386.  The bill would change North Dakota law so that “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” would be given the same protection as race, religion, and national origin. It is sometimes referred to as a “bathroom bill”.

To be blunt, this is a dangerous proposal.

If passed, it would:

The bottom line: It would force women and girls to use the bathroom, shower, or undress next to a man in a public facility.

I testified this week on behalf of Family Policy Alliance of North Dakota and you, our ministry partners. My testimony was well received by the committee which has not yet made a recommendation on HB1386.

The Committee will make a recommendation regarding this matter in the coming days and it will receive a vote on the floor.

There is still time to take action and we need your help more than ever now. Please contact your Representative and ask them to vote against the bill when it is considered on the floor.

Visit our Action Center to identify your Representative and email them about this bill.


Mark Jorritsma
Executive Director

On May 16, 2016, the parents of Derby High School students received an email:

Dear Parents,

Today at Derby High School, a local news outlet produced a story on the recent directive issued from the Federal government relating to transgender students and the use of public school restrooms. Prior to the news story, Derby Public Schools sought legal counsel on the issue. Based on this the district has directed Derby High School to comply with the guidance issued from the President, The United States Justice Department of Civil Rights and Department of Education.

Just like that there were no longer boys and girls bathrooms at Derby High School.

There had been no consultation with parents, no public meetings to discuss or debate such a significant and obviously controversial change in policy. Schools officials had received the Obama administration’s “Dear Colleague Letter on Transgender Students” just days earlier and unilaterally agreed to adopt its radical new interpretation of federal law. The letter, co-issued by the Department of Justice and Department of Education, claims that schools are required to “treat a student’s gender identity as the student’s sex for purposes of Title IX and its implementing regulations.”

In other words, a statute passed in 1972 to protect the rights of girls in educational programs and activities actually preserves the right of boys to identify as girls.

The parents of Derby were having none of it. Swiftly, they began working to preserve the privacy and safety of their daughters and sons and ensuring that their local school would not serve as a vehicle for the revisionist sexual agenda out of Washington, D.C. They spoke up at school board meetings, formed a Facebook group and collected petitions. In the time since, one school board member has been replaced and the superintendent has announced plans to retire.

Now, Family Policy Alliance of Kansas is stepping up to help the parents of Derby in their fight to replace the six remaining members of the school board.

See, this is about more than Derby. Every public school in Kansas received the Obama administration letter and school officials are deciding whether to comply. If we can prove to them that parents won’t have it and there will be repercussions, we won’t be ignored.

We need your help.

The recently introduced Kansas Student Privacy Act instructs schools to maintain separate facilities for boys and girls. It also requires administrators to provide reasonable accommodations for those who ask. Enacting this fair, commonsense law is going to be a battle in Topeka. Will you sign our petition and help move it forward?

Thank you, as ever, for your concern and support of Family Policy Alliance of Kansas. To borrow from The Beatles, “we get by with a LOT of help from our friends.”

Sincerely,

Eric Teetsel
President

common-sense

The bathroom issue will be front and center in many states this year, and Texas is no exception.

Right now, the state Senate is considering SB 6, the Texas Privacy Act, that would stop men from getting access to women’s bathrooms, locker rooms and changing areas.

“Texans overwhelmingly oppose these attacks on women’s privacy and safety,” said Jonathan Saenz with Texas Values. “Our Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick and Sen. Lois Kolkhorst are to be commended for introducing this legislation.”

A recent Texas voter survey found a majority of Texans agreeing that public restrooms should be restricted by gender.

“This bill is written not to bring a controversy,” Kolkhorst said. “The Texas Privacy Act is a thoughtful solution to a sensitive issue. It preserves an expected level of privacy for our public schools and buildings. At the same time, it also allows for schools and universities to make personal accommodations for those requesting an alternate setting. The responsibility falls on all of us to protect citizens and ensure that their personal and private rights are secured.”

PA Bathroom GraphicThe Pennsylvania House of Representatives could vote as early as Tuesday on a “bathroom bill.” HB 1510 would open women’s restrooms, locker rooms, showers and changing areas to everyone, regardless of their biological sex. The measure would also force Christian business owners to violate their conscience when it comes to hiring practices.

State Reps. Dan Frankel and Brian Sims have touted their bill as “anti-discrimination” legislation.  Rep. Daryl Metcalfe has called the bill “dangerous.”

“I was surprised that [Frankel and Sims] are trying to mislead the public with the language of their bill,” Metcalfe told PennLive, pointing out that the bill would offer protection to individuals who prefer to use a restroom that corresponds with their gender identity.

Michael Geer, president of Pennsylvania Family Council, said they’re working hard to defeat the bill.

“Well-funded special interests are hard at work at the Capitol in Harrisburg,” he said, “trying to do an end-run to force the Bathroom Bill on Pennsylvania — despite what the people want.  It is critical that every Pennsylvanian that cares about personal privacy and safety contact their lawmakers in Harrisburg — and say no to HB 1510.”

Gods Not Dead

God’s Not Dead 2 takes on one of the most pressing issues of our time – religious freedom.

In the sequel, a school teacher (played by Melissa Joan Hart), is challenged because she mentioned Jesus in answer to a student’s question. The story unfolds as she heads to court to defend her faith.

Alliance Defending Freedom attorney Erik Stanley defended a case in real life that served as the inspiration for one of the subplots of the film.

“The movie really illustrates the ongoing attack on Christianity in the public square, in the schools and on university campuses,” Stanley said. “And we see that every day in the number of cases that we deal with on this issue.”

In a secondary plot, pastors face pressure to turn over their sermons as part of the case. It mirrors a case he worked on involving Texas pastors who opposed a bathroom bill that allowed men access to women’s locker rooms.

“All that these pastors did was to stand up and speak out against an ordinance that they felt was immoral,” Stanley said, “and in return the city of Houston subpoenaed their sermons, their communications with their members about issues such as homosexuality — really as a message to these pastors that you better be quiet, you better not speak out.”

Grace, the main character in God’s Not Dead 2, stands firm despite intense pressure. It’s a lesson Stanley says more American Christians may have to learn.

“People might think this is sensationalized,” Stanley explained. “but Christians will have a decision to make in the coming days. Do you stand and do you fight, or do you sit down and take it? We know that more often than not, when Christians stand and fight, we win.”

The movie opens in theaters April 1.